Quiz on Catholicism 001 — with Answers

True or False?

1. In order to receive any grace at all from God, we must first turn to Him in a sincere search for goodness and truth.

2. We are unable pray to God for grace or to cooperate with God’s grace, unless God first operates in us, giving us grace before any cooperation or exercise of free will on our part.

3. God wills all human persons to be saved. Christ died to offer salvation to all human persons. Since salvation is offered to all, it must be made concretely available to all.

4. Some persons who die unrepentant from actual mortal sin might still be saved, by being offered a chance to accept or reject Christ, or in some other mysterious manner, known only to God.

5. The state of grace is absolutely necessary at the moment of death. Without it, salvation and eternal happiness are impossible. An act of love is sufficient for the adult to obtain sanctifying grace and to supply the lack of baptism.

6. At the consecration of the Eucharist during holy Mass, the substance of the bread changes into the body and the blood and the soul and Divinity of Christ; likewise, substance of the wine changes into the body and the blood and the soul and Divinity of Christ, so that all of Christ, in both His human nature and Divine Nature, becomes present by this change of substance.

7. Any and all of the Sacraments can be valid, even if they are dispensed by heretics and schismatics, as long as all of the required conditions for validity are met. However, if the person does not intend to do what the Church does, the Sacrament is invalid.

8. Sacred tradition and Sacred Scripture form one Sacred Deposit of Faith. The Magisterium, as the teaching office of the Church, is above the Sacred Deposit of Faith, judging what is true and what should be handed on. Not everything the Magisterium presents as divinely revealed is found in the deposit of faith.

9. It is impossible to qualify as morally evil the deliberate choice of certain kinds of behavior or specific acts, without taking into account the intention for which the choice was made or the totality of the foreseeable consequences of that act for all persons concerned.

10. There exist in the Church a lawful freedom of inquiry and of thought and also general norms of licit dissent. This is particularly true in the area of legitimate theological speculation and research. When conclusions reached by such professional theological work prompt a scholar to dissent from non-infallible received teaching, the norms of licit dissent come into play. The reverence due all sacred matters, particularly questions which touch on salvation, will not necessarily require the responsible scholar to relinquish his opinion.

Place your answers in the comments. By the way, I’ll be holding the comments in the moderation queue, until multiple persons have had a chance to answer.
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ANSWERS

ANSWERS

1. False
2. True
3. True
4. False
5. True
6. False
7. True
8. False
9. False
10. True

1. In order to receive any grace at all from God, we must first turn to Him in a sincere search for goodness and truth.

False.
The Council of Trent, on Justification: “CANON III. — If anyone says, that without the prevenient inspiration of the Holy Ghost, and without his help, man can believe, hope, love, or be penitent as he ought, so as that the grace of Justification may be bestowed upon him; let him be anathema.”

2. We are unable pray to God for grace or to cooperate with God’s grace, unless God first operates in us, giving us grace before any cooperation or exercise of free will on our part.

True.
CCC 2670: “Every time we begin to pray to Jesus it is the Holy Spirit who draws us on the way of prayer by his prevenient grace.”
Council of Orange (not Ecumenical) “CANON 3. If anyone says that the grace of God can be conferred as a result of human prayer, but that it is not grace itself which makes us pray to God, he contradicts the prophet Isaiah, or the Apostle who says the same thing, ‘I have been found by those who did not seek me; I have shown myself to those who did not ask for me’ (Rom 10:20, quoting Isa. 65:1).”

3. God wills all human persons to be saved. Christ died to offer salvation to all human persons. Since salvation is offered to all, it must be made concretely available to all.

True.
Pope John Paul II: “However, as I wrote in the Encyclical Redemptoris Missio, the gift of salvation cannot be limited ‘to those who explicitly believe in Christ and have entered the Church. Since salvation is offered to all, it must be made concretely available to all.’ ” (All Salvation Comes through Christ, General Audience, May 31, 1995)

Cardinal Ratzinger: “In the New Testament, the universal salvific will of God is closely connected to the sole mediation of Christ: ‘[God] desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth. For there is one God; there is also one mediator between God and men, the man Jesus Christ, who gave himself as a ransom for all’ (1 Tim 2:4-6).”

4. Some persons who die unrepentant from actual mortal sin might still be saved, by being offered a chance to accept or reject Christ, or in some other mysterious manner, known only to God.

False.
Pope Benedict XII: “By this Constitution which is to remain in force forever, we, with apostolic authority, define the following…. Moreover, we define that according to the general disposition of God, the souls of those who die in actual mortal sin go down into hell immediately after death and there suffer the pain of hell.” (On the Beatific Vision of God, in the year 1336). The Ecumenical Councils of Lyons II and Florence taught the same doctrine.

5. The state of grace is absolutely necessary at the moment of death. Without it, salvation and eternal happiness are impossible. An act of love is sufficient for the adult to obtain sanctifying grace and to supply the lack of baptism.

True.
Pope Pius XII: “Above all, the state of grace is absolutely necessary at the moment of death; without it, salvation and supernatural happiness — the beatific vision of God — are impossible. An act of love is sufficient for the adult to obtain sanctifying grace and to supply the lack of baptism.” (Address to Midwives, 21.a.)

6. At the consecration of the Eucharist during holy Mass, the substance of the bread changes into the body and the blood and the soul and Divinity of Christ; likewise, substance of the wine changes into the body and the blood and the soul and Divinity of Christ, so that all of Christ, in both His human nature and Divine Nature, becomes present by this change of substance.

False.
The Council of Trent infallibly taught that the substance of bread changes only into the substance of Christ’s body, and the substance of wine changes only into the substance of Christ’s blood. The rest of Christ becomes present, not by a change of substance, but by concomitancy and the hypostatic union.

Council of Trent: “And this faith has ever been in the Church of God, that, immediately after the consecration, the veritable Body of our Lord, and His veritable Blood, together with His soul and divinity, are under the species of bread and wine; but the Body indeed under the species of bread, and the Blood under the species of wine, by the force of the words; but the body itself under the species of wine, and the blood under the species of bread, and the soul under both, by the force of that natural connection and concomitancy whereby the parts of Christ our Lord, who hath now risen from the dead, to die no more, are united together; and the divinity, furthermore, on account of the admirable hypostatical union thereof with His body and soul. Wherefore it is most true, that as much is contained under either species as under both; for Christ whole and entire is under the species of bread, and under any part whatsoever of that species; likewise the whole (Christ) is under the species of wine, and under the parts thereof.” (Trent, 13th Session, chapter 3).

7. Any and all of the Sacraments can be valid, even if they are dispensed by heretics and schismatics, as long as all of the required conditions for validity are met. However, if the person does not intend to do what the Church does, the Sacrament is invalid.

True.
The Council of Trent: “CANON IV. — If anyone says, that the baptism which is even given by heretics in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, with the intention of doing what the Church doth, is not true baptism; let him be anathema.” The Church has always understood this principle to apply to all Sacraments. Therefore, the Second Vatican Council acknowledged that some heretical and schismatic groups have seven valid Sacraments (e.g. the Orthodox Churches).

8. Sacred tradition and Sacred Scripture form one Sacred Deposit of Faith. The Magisterium, as the teaching office of the Church, is above the Sacred Deposit of Faith, judging what is true and what should be handed on. Not everything the Magisterium presents as divinely revealed is found in the deposit of faith.

False.

“This teaching office is not above the word of God, but serves it, teaching only what has been handed on, listening to it devoutly, guarding it scrupulously and explaining it faithfully in accord with a divine commission and with the help of the Holy Spirit, it draws from this one deposit of faith everything which it presents for belief as divinely revealed.” (Second Vatican Council, Lumen Gentium, n. 10.)

9. It is impossible to qualify as morally evil the deliberate choice of certain kinds of behavior or specific acts, without taking into account the intention for which the choice was made or the totality of the foreseeable consequences of that act for all persons concerned.

False.

“The doctrine of the object as a source of morality represents an authentic explicitation of the Biblical morality of the Covenant and of the commandments, of charity and of the virtues. The moral quality of human acting is dependent on this fidelity to the commandments, as an expression of obedience and of love. For this reason — we repeat — the opinion must be rejected as erroneous which maintains that it is impossible to qualify as morally evil according to its species the deliberate choice of certain kinds of behaviour or specific acts, without taking into account the intention for which the choice was made or the totality of the foreseeable consequences of that act for all persons concerned.” (Veritatis Splendor, n. 82)

10. There exist in the Church a lawful freedom of inquiry and of thought and also general norms of licit dissent. This is particularly true in the area of legitimate theological speculation and research. When conclusions reached by such professional theological work prompt a scholar to dissent from non-infallible received teaching, the norms of licit dissent come into play. The reverence due all sacred matters, particularly questions which touch on salvation, will not necessarily require the responsible scholar to relinquish his opinion.

True.

“Norms of Licit Theological Dissent

“There exist in the Church a lawful freedom of inquiry and of thought and also general norms of licit dissent. This is particularly true in the area of legitimate theological speculation and research. When conclusions reached by such professional theological work prompt a scholar to dissent from non-infallible received teaching, the norms of licit dissent come into play. They require of him careful respect for the consciences of those who lack his special competence or opportunity for judicious investigation. These norms also require setting forth his dissent with propriety and with regard for the gravity of the matter and the deference due the authority which has pronounced on it.

“The reverence due all sacred matters, particularly questions which touch on salvation, will not necessarily require the responsible scholar to relinquish his opinion but certainly to propose it with prudence born of intellectual grace and a Christian confidence that the truth is great and will prevail.

“When there is question of theological dissent from non-infallible doctrine, we must recall that there is always a presumption in favor of the magisterium. Even non-infallible authentic doctrine, though it may admit of development or call for clarification or revision, remains binding and carries with it a moral certitude, especially when it is addressed to the Universal Church, without ambiguity, in response to urgent questions bound up with faith and crucial to morals. The expression of theological dissent from the magisterium is in order only if the reasons are serious and well-founded, if the manner of the dissent does not question or impugn the teaching authority of the Church and is such as not to give scandal.

“Since our age is characterized by popular interest in theological debate, and given the realities of modern mass media, the ways in which theological dissent may be effectively expressed, in a manner consistent with pastoral solicitude, should become the object of fruitful dialogue between bishops and theologians. These have their diverse ministries in the Church, their distinct responsibilities to the faith, and their respective charisma.

“Even responsible dissent does not excuse one from faithful presentation of the authentic doctrine of the Church when one is performing a pastoral ministry in her name.” (U.S. Bishops, Human Life in Our Day, 1968)

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4 Responses to Quiz on Catholicism 001 — with Answers

  1. John Platts says:

    1. False
    2. True
    3. True
    4. False
    5. True
    6. False
    7. True
    8. False
    9. False
    10. True

  2. claudia says:

    1. F
    2. F
    3. T
    4. F
    5. T
    6. T
    7. T
    8. F
    9. F
    10. T

  3. Ed says:

    1. False
    2. True
    3. True
    4. False
    5. True
    6. True
    7. False
    8.False
    9. False
    10.True

  4. Zach says:

    1. False
    2. True
    3. True
    4. False
    5. True
    6. True
    7. True
    8. False
    9. False
    10. True

Comments are closed.